Easy recipe: homemade nut milk

almondmilk

Have you ever read the ingredient label on a carton of nut milk from your local supermarket or health food store? Most of them are full of thickeners, coloring agents and sugars. It’s kind of crazy because nut milk is so easy to make! You don’t even need a recipe, really, but here are the instructions for one quart of homemade nut milk.

For all nut milks: begin by soaking one cup of nuts in water with a pinch of sea salt for 10-12 hours (or overnight). Rinse and drain nuts and dump into a blender with a pinch of sea salt. You also can add a pitted date and/or a bit of pure vanilla extract if you like.

For almond or hazelnut milk: add 4 cups filtered water and blend on high speed until liquefied. This might take a couple of minutes depending on how powerful your blender happens to be. Line a wire mesh strainer with fine cheesecloth (or use a nut milk bag) and strain, then transfer the liquid to a sealed quart-sized bottle or jar and keep in the refrigerator for up to one week.

For cashew milk: add 3 cups filtered water and continue as above, but do not strain milk. There’s no need with cashew milk as the cashews will soften and pulverize completely. (The date may not, however, so you may want to substitute a tablespoon of raw honey for the date if you’d like a sightly sweetened cashew milk.)

That’s really all there is to it! If you’re making almond or hazelnut milk, you can take the further step of drying the leftover pulp in the oven or a food dehydrator, then pulsing it for a couple of seconds in a food processor to make nut meal for recipes that call for that ingredient. All for the cost of one cup of raw nuts!

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Easy recipe: homemade nut milk

Raspberry lemonade echinacea gummies

rasplemongummies

Late spring allergies/cold got you down? With gut-healing gelatin, immunity-building echinacea and a hit of natural vitamin C, these bright little stevia-sweetened bites are good for what ails you!

3/4 cup (6 oz.) brewed echinacea tea (I like this one)
3.5 Tbs grass-fed gelatin powder (I like this one)
2/3 cup fresh lemon juice
1/2 cup fresh raspberries (if using frozen, be sure to thaw first)
20 – 30 drops liquid stevia

Gently re-heat tea to just below boiling if needed and whisk in gelatin until dissolved. Pulse lemon juice and raspberries in a blender or food processor until raspberries have liquified, then push through a mesh strainer (discarding seeds and pulp) into a small bowl. Add stevia to taste. Add gelatin mixture and whisk until blended. Pour into molds or a glass dish and chill for at least 1 hour or until set. Then unmold, cut into cubes and store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

Raspberry lemonade echinacea gummies

Chicken ramen (gluten-free, grain-free, dairy-free, egg-free, soy-free)

notramen

This nourishing soup is perfect during cold and flu season!

1 small knob fresh ginger
1 clove garlic
1 medium carrot
1 small zucchini (or 1/4 – 1/2 of a larger one)
1/4 cup shredded cooked chicken
a few dashes coconut aminos
1 cup (8 oz.) chicken broth
2 Tbs. fresh cilantro
one small wedge of lime
a drizzle of sriracha

Mince or grate a bit of ginger and garlic into a big soup bowl. Peel carrot and zucchini with a vegetable peeler, then keep on peeling long ribbons from each one and put them in the bowl. These are your “noodles”. Add chicken, then sprinkle on some coconut aminos. Heat broth to a full boil either on stovetop or in microwave (just be very careful with the latter). Pour broth over vegetables and seasonings in bowl. Dunk all the veggies and meat under the broth and let them steep/cook for a minute or two. Top with fresh cilantro, a squeeze of lime and as much sriracha as your guts can handle. Slurp up with chopsticks. Serves one.

Chicken ramen (gluten-free, grain-free, dairy-free, egg-free, soy-free)